Cancellation System

The main theory behind the Cancellation System is the assumptions that two events with the same chance will occur approximately an equal amount of times (in time). According to this system, you can assume that this will happen within a certain amount of time. The higher your budget is, the longer this amount of time will be, as your chances increase, but so do your financial risks. Cancellation is played on either black or red because here your win chance is approximately 50/50.  Choose beforehand what your bet will be, and how much you can and are willing to lose, potentially.

How does the Cancellation System work?

You start this process by writing down a series of numbers that add up to you’re the total amount that you want to bet on this round. This can be in the form of units (as in that 1 = 5 and 3 = 15). These numbers do not have to be sequential, but may if you prefer. It’s easiest to stick to an even number of numbers in your sequence. Do keep in mind that the higher your numbers are, the higher your risks will be. The outside numbers of your sequence will be where your main focus is placed. Each bet that you make will be a sum of the numbers on the outside; on the left-hand side and right hand side.

When you win, you cross off the numbers that you just added to create the betting amount (the two outermost numbers), reducing the amount of numbers in your row. If you lose, you add the sum of these two outermost numbers, and place the total at the end of the row. Your next bet is then again, the sum of the two outermost numbers, which has now increased. You keep playing until all your numbers are crossed out. If you end up with one number at the end, after you’ve crossed off your outermost numbers, this is the amount you need to bet.

Cancellation System2

Examples

We will show two examples of the Cancellation System; one low risk, and one with higher risks, but both with the same total betting limit.

  • 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 = total bet of 10, Low Risk

Your first bet would be 1 + 1 = 2. If you lose, your next bet would be the previous bet you made, which is added to the series: 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2. Your next bet would be 1 + 2 = 3. If you lose again, it would be 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3. If you should win your next bet (1 + 3 = 4), then you will cross off the outmost numbers in the series; 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3. Winning again (with a bet of 1 + 2 = 3) would mean the following series: 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2. Continue this until you are through all your numbers.

Example

  • 1, 2, 3, 1, 3 = total bet of 10, High Risk

Your first bet would be 1 + 3 = 4. If you lose, your next bet would be the previous bet you made, which is added to the series: 1, 2, 3, 1, 3, 4. Your next bet would be 1 + 4 = 5. If you lose again, it would be 1, 2, 3, 1, 3, 4, 5. If you should win your next bet (1 + 5 = 6), then you will cross off the outmost numbers in the series; 1, 2, 3, 1, 3, 4, 5. Winning again (with a bet of 2 + 4 = 6) would mean the following series: 2, 3, 1, 3, 4. Continue this until you are through all your numbers.

Cancellation System as a Negative Progression

While the Cancellation System is a negative progression, meaning that it is based on increasing your bets when you lose, it is extremely popular. This could be one of the reasons why this system is called by multiple names, such as the Split-Martingale System, or Labouchère. While you can play with a low risk, the high risk can add up rather quickly. You can split the series to decrease the risks. Read more about that on the Labouchère page.